Schedule

Monday, June 23rd

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T1: A Monsoon of Online Teaching and Learning Ideas, Part I
    This session will document best practices for synchronous and asynchronous e-learning as well as blended instruction for active learning environments. In effect, this session will detail key steps of dozens of online learning instructional techniques intended to motivate online adult learners. Session strategies will range for quick hitters and low risk ones to those that exercise one’s risk muscle and may take weeks or months to accomplish. The strategies will be related to learner-centered instruction and the development of online communities. With ideas about online ice breakers, debates, role play, discussion, and team collaboration, the focus will be extremely practical. Therefore, it should be of interest to college instructors, corporate trainers, instructional designers, training managers, researchers, and administrators. Even though the session lasts all day, people can attend the morning, the afternoon, or both sessions and continually gain new ideas.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T3: Designing Web-Based Courses with Authentic Activities
    Jan Herrington , Ron Oliver & Thomas Reeves
    Influenced by constructivist philosophy and new advances in technology, there is increasing interest in authentic activities as a basis for learning in both face-to-face and web-based courses. Whereas traditionally, authentic activities have primarily served as vehicles for practice of skills or processes, a more radical approach is to build a whole course of study around authentic activities and tasks. In this workshop, participants will learn about the theory, research, and development initiatives that provide the foundations for this innovative approach, design complex and sustained tasks for online learning, and explore the implications of the approach for their own areas of interest.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Regency I

    T4: Security in E-Learning
    Edgar Weippl
    This tried-and-true tutorial provides attendants with a comprehensive overview of security issues relevant to e-learning. Even though security has become paramount in many other areas of Web-based business, research in e-learning is still hardly concerned about the issues of security and privacy. Target Audience: 1. Authors creating e-learning content. 2. Teachers using e-learning systems. 3. Managers responsible for the selection and maintenance of e-learning programs.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T6: Multiple Media and Their Efficiency Use in Computer-Based Learning: Multiple Media and their Efficiency use in Computer-Based Learning
    James Alty & Nigel Beacham
    In the 1990’s there were many arguments over the usefulness of media in computer-based education. Today it is accepted that whilst Pedagogy and the quality of the teaching are of prime importance in the education process, media are also important because they affect the cognitive efficiency of the learning process. There have been many poorly controlled experiments to detect the effect of media in education, and in other areas such as process control the effects of media have not been well understood. There is now a considerable body of evidence that can be used to influence the design of computer-based educational material backed by sound psychological principles about human capabilities and limitations. Theories such as Dual Coding Theory and Cognitive Load Theory can now be applied and reasonable predictions obtained. The tutorial will examine the theories and evidence that can support the design of appropriate multimedia interfaces particularly applied to computer-based education.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T10: Creating Intuitive Interfaces for Learning and Reusability
    Susan Metros & John Hedberg
    This tutorial challenges participants to recognize the elements of effective design so that they may create interfaces that intuitively direct interaction and effectively deliver and reuse many types of educational content. In order to design intuitive interfaces for learning, developers and designers must be cognizant of the close relationship between the graphical user interface and the cognitive demands placed upon the user. Two educators, a graphical interface designer and a cognitive psychologist, team up to facilitate this tutorial comprised of web-based multimedia presentations, project demonstrations, critiques and discussions, and small group exercises. Tutorial participants will explore how to identify the visual and cognitive demands of a knowledge domain in order to design interfaces that are functional, usable, communicative, and aesthetically appropriate.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T12: Learning Object Metadata: A Discussion Workshop: Learning Object Metadata: a discussion workshop
    Erik Duval , Stefaan Ternier & Filip Neven
    The objective is to make the participants aware of the scope and current status of world-wide standardization efforts in the field of educational technologies in general, with a strong focus on "learning objects" and "learning object metadata" (LOM) in particular.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T7: A Monsoon of Online Teaching and Learning Ideas, Part II
    This session will document best practices for synchronous and asynchronous e-learning as well as blended instruction for active learning environments. In effect, this session will detail key steps of dozens of online learning instructional techniques intended to motivate online adult learners. Session strategies will range for quick hitters and low risk ones to those that exercise one’s risk muscle and may take weeks or months to accomplish. The strategies will be related to learner-centered instruction and the development of online communities. With ideas about online ice breakers, debates, role play, discussion, and team collaboration, the focus will be extremely practical. Therefore, it should be of interest to college instructors, corporate trainers, instructional designers, training managers, researchers, and administrators. Even though the session lasts all day, people can attend the morning, the afternoon, or both sessions and continually gain new ideas.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T8: Unlocking the Kingdom Gates: Designing/Evaluating Web Pages for Accessibility
    Steven Mills
    Participants in this workshop learn to create and evaluate features of Web pages using principles of universal design to provide accessibility to Internet resources. Web accessibility is based on design principles that allow Web pages to accommodate the needs of a broad range of users, computers, and telecommunications systems. Designing Web pages for accessibility permits anyone browsing the page to gain a complete understanding of the information presented on the page and have an undiminished ability to interact with the page. Topics presented include Accessible Web Design Principles, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and Validation Services. This tutorial provides tips and techniques for page validation and demonstrates examples of accessible and non-accessible Web pages viewed with a speech browser. This tutorial equips Web page authors with tools for implementing and evaluating Web pages that maximize access for all Web surfers.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T9: Digital Storytelling
    Diana Bajzek
    Faculty today have a wide selection of digital media assets, collection tools, software, and distribution options available to them. All of this provides extensive opportunities for faculty to augment their words and teaching materials with effective digital media objects. The biggest asset faculty don't have is time. This tutorial and companion website aims to assist faculty in understanding the effective use of, as well as their own potential for, authoring multimedia learning objects, whether it be something built tonight for one-time use in class tomorrow or something on a larger scale to be used from one semester to the next.

Tuesday, June 24th

  • 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

    Learning Objects 2003 Symposium: Lessons Learned, Questions Asked
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T13: Evaluating Interactive Learning, Part I
    Thomas Reeves & John Hedberg
    Participants in this tutorial will learn how to implement models and procedures for evaluating interactive learning at all levels of education. Tutorial participants will learn to develop, implement, and report specific plans, strategies, and tools for six major phases of the evaluation of interactive learning: 1.review, 2.needs assessment, 3.formative evaluation, 4.effectiveness evaluation, 5.impact evaluation, and 6.maintenance evaluation.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T14: Planning and Designing Online Courses and Learning Resources: PLANNING and DESIGNING ONLINE COURSES and LEARNING RESOURCES
    In this tutorial we discuss and commence the crucial planning and design tasks required to fund and develop online courses and learning resources. The tutorial is developed around a learner-centered framework that examines project proposal, media production and educational design processes and activities. Participants should come with a project idea to develop through the tutorial. We commence developing a persuasive funding proposal for your project idea. Using the facilitator’s learner-centered framework we develop a sound and well-structured project timeline and budget. Potential sources of project funding are identified. Principles and strategies of good online course and learning resource design are examined based on instructional design principles and the concept of alignment. We discuss methods and commence developing the content sequence and learning strategies for your project. The tutorial concludes by discussing potential legal issues and solutions.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T15: Effective Pedagogical Agent Design: Effective pedagogical agent design
    Amy Baylor
    The purpose of this 1/2 day tutorial is to introduce computer scientist researchers and developers to cognitive science empirical research findings regarding appropriate features for designing effective pedagogical agents in learning environments. The focus will be on reviewing research (particularly controlled experimental studies) and in presenting systematic methods for evaluating pedagogical agents.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T16: Online Teaching Guide: Enhancing Lectures Through Internet Integration: Online Teaching Guide:Enhancing Lectures Through Internet Integration
    French Deanie
    Improving Online Teaching is divided into two separate workshops: Laws(3 hrs) and Enhancing Lectures (3 hrs). Gary Marks has stated, “It is essential that accessibility is regarded as an integrated part of online learning/teaching and not as an afterthought or separate component. Thus, an important and primary goal of AACE is to disseminate information on accessibility as integral to online learning." Accessibility features are seamlessly integrated throughout the workshops. HOWEVER, THESE ARE NOT ACCESSIBILITY WORKSHOP! Universal e-learning concepts will be based on the Higher Education Commission guidelines, “Best Practices for Electronically Offered Degree and Certificate Programs,” which are also applicable to industry. The workshop premise is that personal applications are progressive and on-going. All participants will receive the book, Online Teaching Competency: From Lecture Enhanced to Virtual Learning (2003).
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T18: Evaluating Interactive Learning, Part II
    Thomas Reeves & John Hedberg
    Participants in this tutorial will learn how to implement models and procedures for evaluating interactive learning at all levels of education. Tutorial participants will learn to develop, implement, and report specific plans, strategies, and tools for six major phases of the evaluation of interactive learning: 1.review, 2.needs assessment, 3.formative evaluation, 4.effectiveness evaluation, 5.impact evaluation, and 6.maintenance evaluation.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T19: Virtual Dialogues: Asynchronous Online Discussions and Strategies for Effective Facilitation
    Maureen Yoder
    Whether you are teaching an online class or in charge of incorporating online components into a traditional class, you are faced with the challenge of facilitating electronic interactions. Tested strategies, inspired by traditional practices and enhanced by emerging technologies, can increase involvement, focus dialogue, and foster an online community. Techniques will be drawn from the literature on asynchronous communication and from extensive experience with online instruction and asynchronous discussion. How can fewer, but carefully constructed, facilitator interventions be effective in promoting thoughtful, and thought provoking, contributions? Motivating inquiry, supporting individual participants, and addressing multiple learning styles will be addressed.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T20: STREAMING MEDIA 2003–Media for All
    Tony Klejna
    This tutorial is designed as a broad introduction to the development of streaming multimedia projects, various methods of creating content, and means of presenting to your audience. While we will discuss a wide range of solutions for delivering streaming media the primary focus will be the creation of media projects with readily available, low to medium cost tools. These tools and methods are widely available for creating on-line content, presentations, audio, video, and live broadcasts. The differences between analog and purely digital video content, capture and compression techniques, video and audio quality, and ease of use will be discussed. Hardware and software requirements for production of streaming media and using media server technologies and web sites will be discussed with emphasis on new and evolving technologies that make the process more efficient will be covered. Conversion of existing media content to streaming content will be demonstrated.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T21: Project Managing the Development of Instructional Materials
    Joe Luca & Catherine McLoughlin
    Developing multimedia and on-line educational products requires project managers to clearly understand the different elements needed in the development life cycle. Unfortunately, many development teams that come together have inadequate project management skills in quality assurance, cost estimation, risk analysis, legal issues, team management, communication, planning and tracking of milestones. This often causes problems for the project manager in terms of cost, quality and timing. This tutorial presents key project management elements needed to structure the development of on-line educational materials through the use of structured project management methodology and quality assurance procedures. An emphasis will be placed on developing educational product for on-line delivery. Candidates will develop project management models suitable for their environment with relevant quality assurance procedures, and design instructional strategies for creating on-line instructional materials.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T22: Building a Web Site for E-Learning
    Leon Combs
    We propose to spend three hours helping people develop the knowledge base to develop their own web-based courses. They will learn how to use learning styles to design the course, how to embed assessment into the course development, and how to motivate students in an on-line environment. We will discuss the use of audio and video tools, course development software, GIF and JPEG images development and use, storyboarding, and the use of WebCT, Blackboard, and other such systems. Participants should leave with knowledge of which tools are best for their expertise and environment and how to develop expertise in the use of the tools. The emphasis of the session is practical application. Each person should leave with a schedule of steps and a timetable based upon their individual background so that they can develop an excellent web-based course in a reasonable time period. The instructor will maintain contact with participants after the meeting to help them in their course development.

Wednesday, June 25th

Thursday, June 26th

Friday, June 27th

Saturday, June 28th

  • 8:15 AM-9:30 AM

    General Session
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM