Schedule

Monday, June 21st

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T1: Corralling Educational Content: From Learning Objects to Knowledge Networks
    Kathleen Bennett & Susan Metros
    Higher education is struggling with how to define new staff roles, meet the expectations of students and protect faculty’s intellectual capital as technology affords new opportunities to share knowledge. A key challenge is to reframe faculty/course development programs to leverage the power of knowledge networks. Knowledge management (KM) as a formal discipline originated in the business world, which sought profit and innovation from the intellectual assets of employees. This workshop will introduce KM concepts as they apply to the evolution of the academy. Higher education can adopt/transform these business strategies to achieve operational excellence, increased research funding, and enhanced learning environments for all. Digital repositories of quality learning objects offer opportunity to break down discipline silos and use the inherent capabilities of technology to: enhance learning environments, engage faculty in communities of practice, and improve course development and delivery.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T2: Security in E-Learning
    Edgar Weippl
    <A HREF="http://www.e-learning-security.org/tutorial">http://www.e-learning-security.org/tutorial</a><p> This tried-and-true tutorial provides attendants with a comprehensive overview of security issues relevant to e-learning. Even though security has become paramount in many other areas of Web-based business, research in e-learning is still hardly concerned about the issues of security and privacy. The tutorial has already been presented at three conferences, including EDMEDIA 2003. Based the feedback of these tutorials and ongoing research work this year's tutorial will offer insight to recent advances in computer security. The tutorial web site is available at http://www.e-learning-security.org/tutorial. Follow the link “Tutorial” and register with a valid email address. The enrollment key is “hawaii2003”.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    W1: Teaching Creatively Online: Gathering, Sharing and Implementing New Ideas for Teaching Online
    Patrick Kunz & Ross Dewstow
    This workshop will follow a collaborative approach to create and provide good practical information of online teaching and learning. After a short introduction about myths and facts of eLearning and pedagogy of online teaching, participants will brainstorm ideas for online teaching. In groups, attendees will put into action the outcome of the brainstorming by implementing some of the generated ideas into an online environment with the help and guidance from the facilitators. The workshop will conclude with an extended feedback session, where insights of the hands-on experiences will be discussed and collected.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T5: Engaging Learners through Intuitive Interface Design
    John Hedberg & Susan Metros
    TThis popular tutorial challenges participants to engage learners through the effective delivery of online educational content and activities that are instructionally and visually well designed. Participants will learn how to recognize and design interfaces that engage learners through intuitive and direct interaction. Participants also will gain and practice skills in identifying the visual and cognitive demands of a knowledge domain and in designing interfaces that are functional, usable, communicative, and aesthetically appropriate. Two educators, one with expertise in graphical user interface design and the other online learning and cognitive psychology, team up to facilitate this tutorial. They will achieve the tutorial’s objectives by facilitating discussions and presenting media-rich demonstrations; leading critiques of case studies based upon selected educational CD-ROM and Web-based examples; and dividing participants into small groups to define, map and model the knowledge demands of different types of educational content. Facilitators will provide each participant with a CD-ROM of tutorial materials and selected resources.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T6: Designing for Deeper Learning: How Can Learning Objects Help?
    Kathleen Bennett & Patricia McGee
    Designing with learning objects and evaluating their effectiveness are challenges that need to be understood before faculty will comfortably and effectively use objects to support deeper learning. Presenters will model the design process and then the audience will engage in a design activity. The basic metagging standards are in place thanks to the Dublin Core, IMS, IEEE, and ADL. Internet 2, advances in wireless networks, and mobile learning devices are now pervasive in higher education. Add digital repositories and federated search engines and the foundation for a transformation of the teaching and learning with learning objects is now in place. But, faculty roles and curriculum development processes must change. We need a new design model. This presentation will offer and model one innovative approach to using learning objects to support deeper learning.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T7: Adaptive Educational Hypermedia: From Concepts to Authoring
    Peter Brusilovsky
    Adaptive hypermedia (AH) is a new direction of research on the crossroads of hypermedia and adaptive systems. Adaptive hypermedia systems build a model of the individual user and apply it for adaptation to that user, for example, to adapt the content of a hypermedia page to the user's knowledge and goals, or to suggest the most relevant links to follow. AH is especially useful in situations where a hypermedia application is used by individuals with different goals and knowledge and where the hyperspace is reasonably large. Currently, AH is a leading technology for developing adaptive Web-based systems including adaptive Web-based courses. This tutorial will review the concepts of adaptive hypermedia and present a few approaches to authoring Web based adaptive hypermedia.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T8: Media Everywhere - Streaming Media 2004
    Tony Klejna
    This tutorial is designed as a broad introduction to the development of streaming multimedia projects, various methods of creating content, and means of presenting to your audience. While we will discuss a wide range of solutions for broadcasting streaming media the primary focus will be the creation of media projects with readily available, low to medium cost tools. Purely digital video content, capture and compression techniques, video and audio quality will be discussed. Hardware and software requirements for production of streaming media, using media server technologies,and web sites will be discussed with emphasis on new and evolving technologies will be covered. Video captured during the conference will be used to illustrate basic editing, encoding techniques, and web production.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    W2: Technological Assimilation: Best Practices and Implementation
    Patrick Iglehart & Paul Jarmon
    Technological Assimilation: Best Practices and Implementation is a look at the practical methodology utilized at the university level to compel usage of technology. Every classroom at St. Edward's University of Austin, Texas is a SMART classroom designed by technology staff. Classroom technology responses are typically five minutes or less and one third of the display devices are networked. This interactive session will provide examples of successful integration of technology and support techniques for all classrooms. Utilizing teamwork, cooperation and timely support, this is the "Leave No Faculty" behind approach to integration of technology. Included is a guide to the process of transitioning faculty from basic technology usage to supporting more advanced online course management systems and other digital initiatives. The best practices include suggestions and tips for marketing assimilation, as well as examples of statistical measures of success. Participation is encouraged.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, June 22nd

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T10: Designing Web-Based Courses with Authentic Activities
    Thomas Reeves , Jan Herrington & Ron Oliver
    Influenced by constructivist philosophy and new advances in technology, there is increased interest in authentic activities as a basis for learning in both face-to-face and web-based courses. Whereas traditionally, authentic activities have primarily served as vehicles for practice of skills or processes, a more radical approach is to build a whole course of study around authentic activities and tasks. In this tutorial, participants will learn about the theory, research, and development initiatives that provide the foundations for this innovative approach, design complex and sustained tasks for online learning, and explore the implications of the approach for their own areas of interest. Several case studies will be presented. A ten part model for designing and evaluating web-based courses based upon authentic activities will be presented.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T11: Project Management Strategies for Developing Instructional Content
    An understanding of the required project management processes and models can determine the success or failure of the project in terms of cost, quality and time requirements. Unfortunately, many multimedia teams that come together to develop multimedia product have inadequate project management skills in quality assurance, cost estimation, risk analysis, legal issues, accounting, team management, communication, planning and tracking of milestones. The detrimental effect of the lack of these skills has been well documented in many industry, academic and government reports. This tutorial will present key project management elements needed to structure the development of project management models and quality assurance procedures for different sizes and types of multimedia product. Also, for interested participants, an emphasis on developing educational product for on-line delivery will also be considered. Participants will be given a copy a the book “Project Management for New Media” (Luca, 1997).
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T12: R2D2 on the Blend: A Galaxy of Online Learning Style Ideas and Blended Learning Examples
    Instead of debating benefits of online learning, many educators are now exploring ways to blend e-learning technologies and also address specific learning needs. Some might blend in order to take advantage of face-to-face and virtual learning opportunities or to combine technologies. In this talk, Dr. Bonk will lay out several different models and definitions of blended learning as well as the advantages and disadvantages. The session will include more than two dozen different examples of blended learning in actual courses. In addition, he will present a new model for addressing online learning styles called the R2D2 method, including dozens of techniques for auditory, reflective, visual, and hands-on learners. While learning styles continues to be a controversial topic, the diversity of students in online environments has renewed interest in this area. As a result, this session will include practical strategies that can be incorporated directly into one's virtual classes.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T9: Increasing Online Course Offerings through Developing and Presenting Effective Faculty Institutes
    David Starrett & Michael Rodgers
    Online course development initiatives have convinced many administrators that the Internet is an essential component in the delivery of instruction. To give faculty at Southeast Missouri State University the experience with instructional technology needed to produce pedagogically successful online courses, the "Technology Serving Learning Institutes" were developed in 1997. Software and our homegrown course management tools were taught in a context that integrated good pedagogy into course development. The Institutes have attracted over 75% of faculty attending at least one Institute since 1997. Southeast faculty, almost all Institute veterans, increased the number of online courses offered and under development at Southeast from zero to 215 in only five years, with an entire undergraduate degree program online and others under development. Participants will generate a faculty development Institute plan including ideas on establishing collaborations with campus groups, physical setting, securing funds, appropriate topics, scheduling, advertising, level of rigor, facilitators, participant and facilitator stipends, and assessing impact.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T13: Developing Effective Online Courses that Meet Institutional Needs
    David Starrett & Michael Rodgers
    Many institutions now offer online courses which readily attract students. Despite continuing improvements in course management software and faculty development efforts, serious questions remain within academia about the quality and cost effectiveness of online instruction. This tutorial explores several strategies designed to develop and implement online courses that effectively promote the vital interests of both the institution and the students it serves. The Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education will be used as a guide to introduce best practices for teaching online. Approaches to assessment of online course quality and impact will conclude the session. Participants will develop a model of the online course as a product of institution-wide collaboration. Also, participants will explore ways to develop, offer, and teach high-quality online courses in resource-scarce environments.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T14: Evaluating E-Learning
    Conducting a sound evaluation of e-learning requires a "triangulation" approach whereby multiple models and procedures are applied. Conducting comprehensive evaluations of e-learning in a timely and efficient manner is the focus of this tutorial. Why is evaluation of e-learning so important? Around the world, each month sees the introduction of many commercially produced or locally developed programs promoted as effective e-learning systems. Yet systematic evaluation of the implementation and efficacy of these programs is often lacking. This tutorial is specifically designed to establish evaluation as a key strategy throughout the design, development, and implementation of e-learning at all levels of education. Participants will be given access to an electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed to help educators evaluate e-learning.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T15: Creating an Interactive Conference Presentation
    Tony Koppi & Elaine Pearson
    Those of us engaged in the research and practice of effective learning and teaching attend EDMEDIA and other conferences to share, disseminate, learn and seek feedback from colleagues. Many presentations are concerned with developing strategies and competencies for student-centred learning based on constructivist and cognitive theories. Central to these theories is the premise that learning is process and not product oriented; an active and not a passive experience. However, too often presenters (experienced or otherwise) adopt a transmission approach that is the opposite of their espoused philosophy. This tutorial introduces a model for presentations that is consistent with the constructivist principles many of us follow. Participants will use their own paper and develop an interactive presentation by aligning the context, intended outcomes and central purpose, with engagement, support and evaluation.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T16: The Future of E-Learning in Higher Education and Corporate Training: Making Plans
    After a decade of online instruction, it is now important to forecast where this field is headed. Workshop participants will make their predictions about upcoming pedagogical and technological trends. Once established, Dr. Curt Bonk will detail the results of his 2003-2004 survey research studies on the future of e-learning of more than 500 college instructors involved in e-learning and more than 200 human resource and corporate training personnel. In addition, he will also make his own predictions about e-learning technology and pedagogy. Areas highlighted will include blended learning, online course quality, budgetary trends, preferred assessment methods, instructor training, freelance instruction, learning styles, emerging technologies, evaluation, and entrepreneurial relationships. Finally, workshop participants will map out and share their own strategic plans for e-learning. Common themes across participants will form a final report for this workshop.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    W4: Fast Track to Web Accessibility: Making Access a Reality
    Jared Smith & Paul Bohman
    Participants will learn and apply a 5-step process for implementing Web site accessibility. Ensuring the accessibility of Web content to individuals with disabilities is becoming an important role for those in education. Federal laws, local policies, and ethical concerns are motivating educators to make multimedia, hypermedia, and telecommunications content more accessible. However, many people do not know where to start. This hands-on workshop will teach the issues and principles of Web site accessibility and help participants in understanding how to make accessibility a reality.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 5:30 PM-6:00 PM

    Newcomer Welcome

Wednesday, June 23rd

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    Welcome & Opening Keynote: New Media in New Devices: The Democratisation of Learning
    Stephen Heppell
    Throughout history the impact of new technologies have often been to give people a voice: from the pencil to the printing press and on through desktop publishing to the Internet new devices have been empowering people to have a voice, an audience and means of connecting the two. But now a whole host of new pocketable devices are offering individuals and communities that voice through more than just the notational linear narrative of text. Children, from young primary school ages, are harnessing new digital media to offer their views of the world, are using voice and txt to communicate with each other and are swapping their own mixes of music in a peer to peer, almost viral way. None of this is surprising; ICT is information and COMMUNICATION technology after all, but the school curriculum, the buildings, the assessments and the models of organisation needed to house these empowered new learners will need to change to embrace their sense of entitlement and that is a significant challenge for education. TV will not much longer be able to "deliver" content to a compliant and passive audience; equally, education will not be able to "deliver" a curriculum or impose inappropriate assessments in outdated "learning factories". Learners will want a voice and that voice constitutes a new democracy for learning.
  • 9:00-9:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

  • 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

  • 11:45 AM-1:00 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

  • 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

  • 3:15-3:30 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

  • 4:45 PM-5:45 PM

  • 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Thursday, June 24th

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    Keynote & Awards: We're on the Road to...: We're on the road to...
    The field of “Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications” is now at least 40 years old. Yet, it can be argued that we have failed to make any real impact on the way most people learn. In this keynote, I will reflect on some of the root causes for this situation and I will outline some of the approaches to “get better at getting better”.
  • 9:00-9:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

  • 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

  • 11:45 AM-1:00 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

  • 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

  • 3:15-3:30 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

  • 4:45 PM-5:45 PM

  • 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Friday, June 25th

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    Keynote: Online Communities: Designing Usability, Supporting Sociability
    Jenny Preece
    The increase in social interaction via the Internet is phenomenal. More and more people are communicating with their families, friends, neighborhood groups, political parties, support groups, and interest groups across the world. These online communities have become a key source of information and support. They enable patients to cope better with their diseases, students to discuss homework projects, hobbyists to pursue their passions, and teens to chat about their lives. Scholars use them to track academic topics, lawyers seek legal information, and professionals exchange business knowledge. A variety of software facilitates information exchange and communication including discussion boards, instant messaging, blogs, wikis, and immersive virtual environments. This trend has given rise to a new field of interest within HCI known as social computing. Developers and managers must pay attention to both usability and sociability if their online communities are to evolve successfully. Usability is about users’ experience at the human-computer interface. Sociability is about the social interactions between people mediated by software. In this talk I will describe a framework for designing usability and supporting sociability that focuses on the people, the purposes and policies that give an online community its character. The approach relies on participative community-centered development in which technical developers work with the community to create the software and initial policies that form the basis for the evolving community. The talk will be heavily laced with examples and anecdotes from education online communities and I will end by presenting an agenda for research.
  • 9:00-9:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

  • 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

  • 11:45 AM-1:00 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

  • 2:15 PM-3:15 PM

  • 3:15-3:30 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

Saturday, June 26th

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    What to Do About E-dropouts: Tangible Strategies for Engagement and Persistence
    While interest is strong, the larger picture disappoints. Recent studies find a steady increase in independent participation in learning online but drop-out numbers that are nothing but ugly. Despite recent advances in media based learning, people drop out of e-courses in large numbers, especially in corporate and government asynchronous settings. Why? Let's look at what the literature says about what the learner, the media asset, and the organization can do to reduce halting engagement and the failure to persist. We will focus on practices for attracting, riveting and holding online learners.
  • 9:00-9:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

  • 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

  • 11:45 AM-1:00 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

  • 2:15 PM-3:15 PM