Schedule

Monday, June 27th

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Joyce

    T1: Teaching Creatively Online: Gathering, Sharing and Implementing Ideas for Teaching Online
    Patrick Kunz Patrick & Ross Dewstow
    This tutorial will follow a collaborative approach to create and provide good practical information of online teaching and learning. After an introduction about myths and facts of eLearning and pedagogy of online teaching, participants will brainstorm ideas for online teaching. In groups, attendees will work on the outcome of the brainstorming by look into the details of some of the generated ideas and investigate what it would take to put them into action. The tutorial will conclude with an extended feedback session, where insights of the group-work will be discussed and collected.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Hemon

    T2: Advanced Design for Online Learning
    Enhance your instructional design skills for online materials. See examples of effective e-learning and de-construct the reasons for their success. Similarly, learners may submit modules of in-process work for review and the class can offer developmental feedback. In the process of exploring these examples and extrapolating lessons for your future e-learning programs about interface design, screen design, interactivity, assessment, writing for the screen, and communicating visually, also learn about the problem-based approach to instructional design (Driscoll & Carliner, in press).
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Musset

    T3: Security and Dependability in E-Learning
    Edgar Weippl
    Considering the enormous costs of creating and maintaining courses, it is surprising that security is not yet considered an important issue by most people involved, including teachers and students. Unlike traditional security research, which has largely been driven by military requirements to enforce secrecy, in the realm of e-learning it is not the information itself that has to be protected against unauthorized access but, the way it is presented. In most cases the knowledge contained in e-learning programs is more or less widely available; therefore, the asset is not the information itself but the hypermedia presentation used to convey it. Dependability includes most security requirements but does no longer focus on confidentiality, a requirement that is considered not that important by many teachers and students. In this tutorial we build on the findings published in our book "Security in E-Learning" (to be published by Springer NY in 2005) and extend them to include aspects of dependability.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Jarry

    T4: What Makes Online Learning “Good”?: A Conceptual Model Supported by Real Examples: What Makes Online Learning Good?: A Conceptual Model Supported by Real Examples
    Josephine Csete , Paul Lam & Yiu-Hing Wong
    eLearning facilitates at least three main kinds of learning-enhancing interaction: interaction with content, with instructors, and with peers (Swan, 2003). This tutorial demonstrates how the Web can effectively assist teaching and enhance interaction by showcasing real success stories of eLearning tools supported by the e3Learning Project. The web materials are drawn from over 100 purpose built websites and learning objects, and from a variety of disciplines utilizing many different web tools and methods (such as animations, simulations, and peer critiques). They have been used in three universities in Hong Kong. The instructors will bring along a limited number of notebook computers for participants to actively try out the working examples, and discuss the applicability of the tools and methods to their own environments. Participants are also encouraged to bring their own notebook computers along. All participants will be granted access to a website and/or given a CDROM containing materials from this session as resources for their future use. Please refer to http://e3learning.edc.polyu.edu.hk/EdMedia05TutorialProposal for more information.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Hemon

    T5: Engaging Learners through Intuitive Interface Design
    John Hedberg
    This popular tutorial challenges participants to engage learners through the effective delivery of online educational content and activities that are instructionally and visually well designed. Participants will learn how to recognize and design interfaces that engage learners through intuitive and direct interaction. Participants also will gain and practice skills in identifying the visual and cognitive demands of a knowledge domain and in designing interfaces that are functional, usable, communicative, and aesthetically appropriate. Two educators, one with expertise in graphical user interface design and the other online learning and cognitive psychology, team up to facilitate this tutorial. They will achieve the tutorial�s objectives by facilitating discussions and presenting media-rich examples; demonstrating the process behind developing award winning educational content designed by the tutorial leaders and dividing participants into small groups to define, map and model the knowledge demands of sample educational technology scenarios.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Jarry

    T6: STREAMING MEDIA 2005 – Five Technologies for 2005
    Anthony Klejna
    This tutorial is designed as a broad introduction to the development of streaming multimedia projects, various methods of creating content, and means of presenting to your audience. We will look at five significant technologies from vendors for this year. Windows Media, Real Networks, QuickTime, MPEG-4, and finally Macromedia Flash have all made significant improvements in both quality and ease-of-use during the past year. While we will discuss a wide range of solutions for broadcasting streaming media the primary focus will be the creation of media projects with readily available, low to medium cost tools. These tools and methods are widely available for creating on-line content, presentations, audio, video, and live broadcasts. The differences between analog and purely digital video content, capture and compression techniques, video and audio quality, and ease of use will be discussed. Hardware and software requirements for production of streaming media and using media server technologies and web sites will be discussed with emphasis on new and evolving technologies that make the process more efficient will be covered.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Joyce

    T7: Creating Standards for E-Learning Development
    Scott Wilson
    This session will provide an overview of the process of designing, developing and implementing project standards for typical e-learning projects and other web based learning applications. The creation of standards and a structured means for change management are critical to the successful development and implementation of any e-learning application, whether in higher education or corporate / government training. Standards not only help the development process remain "on-time" and "within budget" but also significantly contribute to producing a much higher quality end product. This process is independent of authoring tool used and is intended for anyone involved with New Media development. The standards process is appropriate for the development of all types of new media applications, but the session will emphasize e-learning applications. Real-world examples will serve as the framework for the content being presented, with numerous job aids, forms, models and processes being provided. The development process is appropriate for all types of multimedia applications, but there will be an emphasis on training and e-learning applications.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Musset

    T8: Web-Based Learning: Assumptions, Design, Instruments
    This tutorial aims to address and discuss the features, opportunities and challenges of Web-Based Learning (WBL) in our current social, educational and technological settings. The World Wide Web has reached a level of maturity (though not of seamless integration into educational activities) and acceptance. Given the fact that it is going to be integrated more and more into educational activities, sometimes under strong constraints, there is the need to study under a wide perspective. Faculty and students need to understand the social, humane, and pedagogical bases under which the Web may be used effectively in education. This tutorial then proposes (1) to look at the Web as a fundamental pedagogical tool under various points of view, and (2) to take into account and integrate research and interpretations from diverse sources, especially sociology, semiotics and learning theories. As a result, the tutorial will propose a practical development model for WBL and investigate alternatives, according to the audience participation.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, June 28th

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Joyce

    T10: Designing Web-Based Courses with Authentic Activities
    Ron Oliver
    Influenced by constructivist philosophy and new advances in technology, there is increased interest in authentic activities as a basis for learning in both face-to-face and web-based courses. Whereas traditionally, authentic activities have primarily served as vehicles for practice of skills or processes, a more radical approach is to build a whole course of study around authentic activities and tasks. In this tutorial, participants will learn about the theory, research, and development initiatives that provide the foundations for this innovative approach, design complex and sustained tasks for online learning, and explore the implications of the approach for their own areas of interest. Several case studies will be presented. A ten part model for designing and evaluating web-based courses based upon authentic activities will be presented.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Jarry

    T11: Developing Online Learning Materials – Project Management, Design & Pedagogy
    Joseph Luca & Catherine McLoughlin
    An understanding of project management processes and models can determine the success or failure of any project in terms of cost, quality and time requirements. Unfortunately, many multimedia development teams that come together have inadequate project management skills in quality assurance, cost estimation, risk analysis, legal issues, accounting, team management, communication, planning and tracking of milestones. The detrimental effect of not having these skills has been well documented in many industry, academic and government reports. This tutorial will present key project management elements needed to develop appropriate project management models and quality assurance procedures for different sizes and types of multimedia product. Even though the process presented is generic, an emphasis will be placed on developing educational materials for on-line delivery. A CD-ROM with templates, procedures, book (Luca, 97) and relevant readers will be given to all participants.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Musset

    T12: Creating High-Performance Virtual Teams
    Benay Dara-Abrams, Michael Bischoff, Maggie McPherson , Toby DeLoght & Ann Shortridge
    While work has been conducted across distances as long as humans have engaged in work, advances in technology as well as changes in the global economy have increased both the requirement and the potential for people to work together across geographical and organizational boundaries. Coupling the dynamics of distributed teamwork and group development process with the technologies of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL), Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and groupware, this tutorial presents a framework for building virtual teams, which move through necessary development stages to become high-performance virtual teams. Participants will learn about the stages of the group development process, the dynamics of virtual teamwork, and the technologies available to support virtual teams. In addition, participants will engage in group exercises, applying a Virtual Team Development Framework to create virtual teams as well as to solve problems with existing virtual teams.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Salon Hemon

    T9: R2D2 on the Blend: A Galaxy of Online Learning Style Ideas and Blended Learning Examples
    Curt Bonk & Charles Graham
    Instead of debating benefits of online learning, many educators are now exploring ways to blend e-learning technologies and also address specific learning needs. Some might blend in order to take advantage of face-to-face and virtual learning opportunities or to combine technologies. In this talk, Drs. Bonk and Graham will lay out several different models and definitions of blended learning as well as the advantages and disadvantages. The session will include more than two dozen different examples of blended learning in actual courses. In addition, they will present a new model for addressing online learning styles called the R2D2 method, including dozens of techniques for auditory, reflective, visual, and hands-on learners. While learning styles continues to be a controversial topic, the diversity of students in online environments has renewed interest in this area. This session will also include practical strategies that can be incorporated directly into one's virtual classes.
  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Hemon

    T13: Blogs, Boards, Borgs, and Just a Bit of Bonk: Best Practices Bring Us Back to the Future
    Curt Bonk , Veronica Acosta-Deprez & TingTing Zeng
    This fun packed session will focus on online community tools and courseware systems needed for intellectually and pedagogically rich, collaborative, and engaging online learning. It will include an interactive and engaging overview of current best practices in online learning pedagogy (from Oliver, Berge, Collis, Harasim, Salmon, etc.), including the use of the famous Bonk Bingo Board. Then it will expand these ideas into visions of where we should go next—toward a community of innovative online instructors who seamlessly share their best online teaching ideas and practices. Beyond the samples you might taste at MERLOT (see http://www.merlot.org/)! Beyond its CAREO clone in Canada (see http://www.careo.org/)! It will provide a glimpse of the future of e-learning based on large survey data he has collected and a handbook of blended learning that Dr. Bonk recently edited. While resistance to online learning may be futile, it is vital to think carefully about where we are headed.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Jarry

    T15: Beyond the "E" in e-Learning: A Technical Perspective
    Abdulmotaleb El Saddik
    The tutorial first presents a brief overview of multimedia applications needed for e-learning and shows some java applets and video clips of emerging multimedia services. It then introduces the fundamental networking technologies used for multimedia-based e-services. Particular emphasis is placed on the basic video and audio conferencing techniques, including the entire MPEG and H263. Next, the Internet protocols and languages, which are essential for the development of E-learning system, will be discussed. Fundamental e-security procedures and protocols are presented, as also new authentication and content protection procedures such as digital watermarking. The tutorial also demonstrates new multimedia applications in e-commerce, tele-learning, tele-collaboration, tele-training and tele-medicine using Collaborative Virtual Reality.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon Musset

    T16: Synchronous Technologies: How to Plan and Deliver Effective Online Classes and Seminars
    Lisa Neal
    Synchronous technologies offer a way to teach or present to a geographically dispersed group. When used well, synchronous sessions can offer opportunities for richer discussion than is possible face-to-face. Synchronous sessions also offer convenience to participants, especially when an archive can be made available. However, the successful use of synchronous technologies requires a number of steps to achieve a flawless session, specifically: when to use synchronous technologies; which features are available and when, why, and how to use them; how presenting online is different than face-to-face; what is the impact of session purpose and group size, cohesion, and formality; and how to create an effective participant experience.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

Wednesday, June 29th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom East

    Welcome & Opening Keynote: "Engaging Technolog(ies) for Effective Interaction"
    Jeremy R. Cooperstock
    All too often, engineers focus their energies on features and functionality to the detriment of user experience, resulting in the proliferation of products that nobody can use. Drivel buzzwords such as "user-friendly" are applied to systems that are anything but. In contrast, our efforts to support high quality interaction, suitable for the stringent demands of education, have been concerned directly with the user experience above all else. With such a design goal, marketing-driven priorities give way to user-centered concerns of quality, interaction, and engagement. With respect to the latter, this is successful only to the degree to which the technology avoids distracting, and instead, allows users to focus their attention on the task at hand. The technologies we describe all adhere to this key principle, albeit for very different applications. Ultra-Videoconferencing engenders geographically distributed participants with a powerful sense of co-presence through very low-delay and high-fidelity audio and video. Shared Reality synthesizes a rich, immersive space in which the participants perceive themselves to be in the same room, collaboratively viewing and manipulating the same virtual objects. Finally, the Intelligent Classroom enables instructors to make effective use of a diverse range of presentation technology without having to concern themselves with control of the user interface. Like Weiser's paradigm of Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp), we believe that "the most effective technology is that which is essentially invisible to the user." Thus, only when we observe users working with these systems, seemingly oblivious to the underlying technology, have we truly succeeded.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

  • 5:15 PM-7:15 PM
    in Ballroom West

Thursday, June 30th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom East

    Keynote & Awards: "From a Different Perspective"
    Diana Oblinger
    Generational differences and dissimilar expectations often cause faculty, administrators, and staff to view programs and services differently than learners. This may be especially true when it comes to information technology. The mismatch of expectations may be particularly acute between the Net Generation and Baby Boomers, however, there are some surprises. This presentation explores the different perspectives of students, faculty, administrators, and employers as well as the implications for college and university practices and programs.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

    Sessions
  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

    Sessions
  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

    Sessions
  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

    Sessions
  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

    Sessions
  • 5:15 PM-7:15 PM
    in Ballroom West

Friday, July 1st

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom East

    Keynote: "Playing Live: Designing Interactive, Engaging, and Jazzy Learning Spaces, aided by Mobile Technology"
    Hillel Weintraub
    New Media and new uses of media come and go, changing the face of learning often, But the hearts of learners are rarely heard to resonate. One reason for this is that learning environments are so poorly designed for people to express themselves and their own theories or their own stories. However, learning design can be such that any media in any space can be used in a way that learning can be hard fun, full of challenge, mystery and surprise, and perhaps most importantly, personal. This keynote will take a look at some of the recent advances in mobile learning, particularly in Japan, and how they might be put to use in educational contexts in order to create engaged, interactive and playful learning. Also, in keeping with the spirit of our neighboring event (Montreal Jazz Festival), we'll consider how learning design can be like a jazzy improv! Working with Hillel will be some friends from a group called "Mudpie", with whom he has published a book called "Playful Pieces" (http://www.dresearch.net/CYBRARY/PLAYSHOP/1999/BOOK/index.html): Yoshiro Miyata, professor of Media Science at Chukyo University in Nagoya, Japan, and Nobuyuki Ueda, Professor of Contemporary Child Studies at Doshisha Women's College of Liberal Arts in Kyoto, Japan. Also joining Hillel in his keynote talk will be members of BEAT (Benesse Educational Advanced Technology) Project. (http://www.beatiii.jp/e/)
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

    Sessions
  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

    Sessions
  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

    Sessions
  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

    Sessions
  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

    Sessions

Saturday, July 2nd

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom East

    Keynote: "Computing in Freedom, from Software to Education"
    Richard Stallman
    Since the 1980s, recognition has developed that a free society using computers entails software that is free as well: that is, users must have the freedom to share and change the software they use. But programs are not the only useful, practical works that you could have on your computer. Educational materials raise the same issues; they, too, must respect these freedoms.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

    Sessions
  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

    Sessions
  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

    Sessions