Schedule

Monday, June 30th

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T1: New Media in Education: The “How to Do It” Tutorial
    Anthony Klejna
    This tutorial is a “How-to” in development of new media projects, various methods of creating content, and means of presenting to your audience. We will create on-demand videos, a podcast, a video podcast, and a live webcast during the tutorial. Adobe, Microsoft, Real, QuickTime, and MPEG-4 have all made significant during the past year. Delivery to cell phones, handhelds, and multiple devices, and IPTV is now a reality. The primary goal will be the creation of media projects with readily available tools that can get your media to your audience by multiple delivery methods. Media from the conference is used to illustrate basic editing, encoding, and production techniques. All tutorial content will be made available to tutorial participants via CD-ROM. Bring you notebook to participate in the demonstrations!
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    W1: Web 2.0 - Creating user Extensible, Student-Centered Learning Environments (bring your laptop)
    Kevin Pyatt
    While Web 2.0 has received much hype as the “latest and greatest” technology, some attention should be paid to exactly how Web 2.0 tools can be used to create student-centered instruction. This workshop will highlight the differences between industrial-age learning and information-age learning as it relates to Web 2.0’s ability to serve as a platform for creating customizable, student-centered learning environments. The concept of user extensibility will be introduced as the underpinning of Web 2.0. We will focus on Web 2.0’s potential to spawn the creation of learner-centered environments rich in synchronous, immersive interaction. This session will also introduce Web 2.0 tools which can be used to provide students opportunities to create their own knowledge, independently and collaboratively. Participants will explore the user-extensible nature of Web 2.0 technologies through hands-on interactions, discussions, and reflections. Participants will gain a new understanding of the implications of Web 2.0 as it relates to creating student-centered instruction and information-age instruction. Special attention will be paid to Open Source applications.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    W2: New Models and Frameworks for the Use of Digital Video Archives in Tertiary Education: Moving beyond Content (laptops provided for participants)
    Kevin Burden , Simon Atkinson & Theo Kuechel
    This half -day workshop (3.5 hours) addresses many of the key themes of the conference through the use and adaptation of video archives. Video archives are emerging as a major source of teaching and learning material for the tertiary community and build upon an existing awareness and familiarity young people have acquired with online video through the medium of YouTube and the like. The workshop will demonstrate a new approach to the use of digital video archives in teaching and learning based on a conceptual framework developed by the authors. This will be use to illustrate, with exemplars and problem-solving scenarios, how video from a range of worldwide video archives can be used to develop higher levels of engagement, critical thinking and student independence. The workshop will explore how these approaches can be transferred to specific disciplines in order to develop higher order thinking skills such as analysis, explanation, augmentation, synthesis, extrapolation and interpretation. Participants will undertake practical work using computers to explore and develop their own exemplars and ideas for use in teaching within their own institutions.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    W3: Making, Sharing & Evaluating Learning Objects (bring your laptop)
    Dawn Leeder, Tom Boyle , Heather Wharrad & John Cook
    This acclaimed half-day workshop provides an introductory “tour” of the activities that comprise the professional development programme at the Centre for Excellence in Teaching & Learning in Reusable Learning Objects (RLO-CETL), UK. The programme is designed to enhance skills and harness expertise by rewarding excellence. Participants work collaboratively in multi-disciplinary teams and are exposed to a wide range of resources and techniques. The workshop consists of a series of lively and engaging taster sessions devised and delivered by RLO-CETL staff. Participants will have hands-on experience of reusable learning objects (RLOs), generative learning objects (GLOs) and mobile learning objects (MLOs), and their development, usr, reuse, adaptation and evaluation. Participants will be able to use the interactive resources through the innovative medium of “CETL-on-a-stick”. This is a high volume memory stick containing a portable server environment that will run directly on participants’ laptops during the session and also contains all the workshop materials plus numerous other goodies that they can take away with them.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T2: Integrating Established and Emerging Web-based Technologies – Effective Tools for the Instructor
    Marie-Pierre Huguet & Sehnaz Baltaci-Goktalay
    Established and emerging technologies have become some of the most powerful tools available in Web-based instruction. They facilitate teaching and learning, stimulate new ideas about the educational process, and force instructors to challenge the way they teach and learn. But how should they select such tool(s) and technologies and how do they effectively implement them in a Web-based environment? Most importantly, how do they ensure that pedagogy, not technology, is driving the selection and the implementation? The participants will be lead through a series of mini presentations, discussions, and hands-on activities that will enable them to identify the tools and technologies that work best for them and their institutions to ultimately develop their own, successful Web-based course. Other tools and technologies discussed will include: learning management systems, synchronous and asynchronous tools, podcasting, blogs, wikis, HTML editors, accessibility tools.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T3: Creating Digital Stories with Adobe Design CS3
    Linda Wright-Smith
    Digital storytelling gives voice to many groups who are not commonly heard. In the process of creating digital stories, people master the use of different multimedia tools to succinctly share a part of their world and open up dialogue with an international online community. This tutorial covers the creative step-by-step digital storytelling process. Using video interviews, pictures, and research data gathered while in the village of San Vicente de Nicoya de Guanacaste Costa Rica, the author first goes through the preproduction, production and publishing process. The objects created in preproduction are put together in Flash CS3. The product is published and put online using Adobe Dreamweaver CS3. The goal of this tutorial is to give the participant an elementary working knowledge of Adobe Design CS3’s Photoshop, Flash, and Dreamweaver software in order to successfully produce and publish a digital story.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T4: Designing Web-Based Courses with Authentic Tasks
    Although authentic approaches appear to be found more and more in web-based learning environments in higher education as course management systems become more flexible, many teachers are still uncertain about how to design authentic learning environments. With advances in technology, there is increased potential for authentic tasks to be used as a basis for learning in both face-to-face and web-based courses, but high end technology and life like graphics are not necessary for such tasks to be truly engaging. Whereas traditionally, real life examples have primarily served as vehicles for practice of skills or processes, a more radical approach is to build a whole course of study around authentic activities or tasks. In this workshop, participants will learn about the theory, research, and development initiatives that provide the foundations for this innovative approach, design complex and sustained tasks for online learning, and explore the implications of the approach for their own areas of interest.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    W5: Getting Started in the Virtual World Second Life: A New Venue for Education (bring your laptop)
    Carolyn Lowe , Donald Bickley & John Lowe
    Many universities, agencies, organizations and businesses are entering the virtual world of Second Life, many for the purpose of education. Second Life is not a game. It is, instead, an international virtual world created and built by those who participate. There aremany opportunities for socializing, building, creating, designing, collaborating and education. Educational practices in Second Life are amazingly rich, interactive and exciting, and vary from a classroom for a “face-to-face” distance education course to very interactive educational activities. As a creator and builder of an island of interactive content in science and classroom setting, as well as an instructor of many distance education and hybrid courses, I, along with my co-presenter, have learned efficient ways to get up and running quickly in Second Life. In this workshop, we will walk the participants through creating a free account and avatar, learning to maneuver and use some basic tools. We will also develop a support and social group in Second Life for these participants along with a box of free virtual materials.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, July 1st

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    Welcome & Opening General Session (Keynote): Playing Games: Hegemony as Enemy
    Many argue that the three most influential writers today are Umberto Eco, Richard Dawkins and Noam Chomsky. In Dreaming in the Middle Ages, Eco defines the phenomena of neomedievalism to confront pop-culture in a globalised corporate world – the language and structures of the past are perpetuated into a future where fiefdoms exploit and undermine civil society. Dawkins, on the other hand uses signs and symbols of science to explore and decry the rise of fundamentalist belief systems. Chomsky, who was involved in the development of cognitive science when he challenged Skinner's behaviourist approach to the study of language, continues to explore power relations especially those related to American politics. Therefore modern fiefdoms perpetuate fundamentalism through capitalistic and religious power structures. Are the relationships between educational technology, society and teaching and learning, which are part of Eco-Dawkins-Chomsky world view, perpetuating the past into the future? This presentation explores the design, development, use and evaluation of educational technology in relationship to belief systems to identify the rhetorical acts that are part of the dialectic struggle to liberalise and democratise educational practices.
  • 9:00-9:45 AM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:05 AM-12:05 PM

  • 12:05 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:50 PM-3:50 PM

  • 3:50 PM-4:10 PM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 4:10 PM-5:10 PM

  • 5:30 PM-6:30 PM

Wednesday, July 2nd

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    General Session (Keynote & Paper Awards): Moving beyond the Plentitude: An Indian Fable
    Geetha Narayanan
    Designing and using new media effectively in classrooms in ways that sustain, engage and transform is challenging for everyone working in the field of educational media today. Using experiences and contexts set in India, this paper posits a serious need to move the designing and creating of these tools from being just “stuff” that form part of what is being described today as the “Plentitude”. Moving from just making and using digital “stuff” in classrooms to working at creating vibrant and creative ways that foster deep learning is the challenge of our times. This challenge is one that needs educators, policy makers and designers to make a conscious shift from the philosophy of the plentitude to a philosophy of slowness and connectedness.
  • 9:00-9:45 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:05 AM-12:05 PM

  • 12:05 PM-1:30 PM in FH (1st Fl)
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:50 PM-3:50 PM

  • 3:50 PM-4:10 PM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 4:10 PM-5:10 PM

  • 5:30 PM-6:30 PM

  • 6:45 PM-8:15 PM

Thursday, July 3rd

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    General Session (Keynote): "Where is the Mentor?": New Ways of Supporting Learning
    Peter J. Scott
    In a world in which the distinction between the teacher and the learner is increasingly fuzzy, the concepts of effective mentoring and peer support are thrown strongly into focus. Indeed, major new open content initiatives such as the "OpenLearn" work ( http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/ ) of the Open University in the UK, show that the entire architecture of learning support is as important as the content itself. Opening up learner support requires that students mentor and help each other to grow. The next question for future universities is how we support this trend and leverage it. Formal learners in universities, and their formal mentors need as much help as the growing communities of informal and non-formal learners that inhabit the new web world. So, if we can measure mentoring, nurture it and understand it better; that would neat!
  • 9:00-9:45 AM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:05 AM-12:05 PM

  • 12:05 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:50 PM-3:50 PM

  • 3:50 PM-4:10 PM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 4:10 PM-5:10 PM

  • 5:30 PM-6:30 PM

Friday, July 4th

  • 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

    General Session (Keynote): Technology Enhanced Learning in the 21st Century - The Role of European Research
    Patricia Manson
    In a context where technologies are increasingly pervasive and where the Internet and social software are the new social currency for many people, especially the young, there are both new challenges and opportunities for effectively marrying ICTs and learning, be it at school, at home or in the workplace. However, experience has revealed the importance of giving equal weight to the technologies, to the learning and to the improvements in learning. The concept of technology-enhanced learning research has emerged from that experience, shifting from reproducing classical ways of teaching via technologies to the notion of improvements or advancements in learning at the core of research. European co-funded research (about 50 MEur just over the last 2 years) is an important support for the research community to advance the state of the art. We see, in turn, learning technologies being integrated in business processes, corporate knowledge management and human resource systems, and include performance support and competency-skills governance. They are deepening the level of individualisation of learning, i.e. the tailoring of pedagogy, curriculum and learning support to meet the needs and aspirations of individual learners. Projects are innovating practices of working with knowledge, transforming ideas and social practices for problem solving and creativity, for effective decision-making or facilitating learning in community of practises. Advances in narratives, virtual characters and storytelling are driving forward the research agenda on interfaces for learning. In the years to come, the European Union will continue its financial support for research on technology enhanced learning, and will do so fostering a truly cross disciplinary approach, spanning cognitive science, educational technologies, neuroscience and technological advances in areas such as cognitive systems, semantic technologies, interfaces. However, if technology is truly to enhance learning in the 21st century, the research community needs to build a convincing body of evidence so that these new approaches do not remain the province of research but are accepted and adopted widely by those who train, those who learn and those who teach.
  • 9:00-9:45 AM in FH (1st Fl)
    Beverage Break

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:05 AM-12:05 PM

  • 12:05 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:50 PM-3:50 PM