Schedule

Monday, June 22nd

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Honolulu

    T1: Evaluating E-Learning
    To conduct a comprehensive evaluation of e-learning requires a "triangulation" approach whereby multiple models and procedures are applied. Conducting comprehensive evaluations of e-learning in a timely and efficient manner is the focus of this tutorial. Why is evaluation of e-learning so important? Around the world, each month sees the introduction of many commercially produced or locally developed programs promoted as effective e-learning. Yet systematic evaluation of the implementation and efficacy of these programs is often lacking. This tutorial is specifically designed to establish evaluation as a key strategy throughout the design, development, and implementation of e-learning at all levels of education and training. Participants will be given access to an electronic performance support system (EPSS) designed to help educators evaluate e-learning.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Oahu

    T2: Putting the Media in ED-Media: The “How Do I Do It?” Tutorial
    Anthony Klejna
    The presenter of this session was recently honored by Streaming Media Magazine as one of the 25 people who have done the most to advance, promote, and educate the streaming media industry over the last ten years and is the recipient of 5 Telly Awards. Do you want to use media but have questions about doing it? This tutorial is a “How-to” in developing New Media projects. The first thing we are going to do is create a live webcast of the session. Then we will create on-demand videos, a podcast, and a video podcast. We are going to talk about the software that you use to create projects. We will also discuss delivery to cell phones, handhelds, and multiple devices and an overview of the networks used to deliver your projects. The primary goal will be the creation of media projects with readily available tools that can get your media to your audience by multiple delivery methods. Media from the conference is used to illustrate basic editing, encoding, and production techniques. All tutorial content will be made available to tutorial participants. Bring you notebook computer to participate in the demonstrations!
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Kahuku

    W1: Using Open Source Tools to Create Multimedia for Online Courses (Bring Your Laptop): Using Open Source and Web 2.0 Tools to Create Multimedia for Online Courses (Bring Your Laptop)
    Alexis Alexander
    This workshop will demonstrate the wide variety of open source tools for creating multimedia that are currently available on the Internet. These tools can be used to create videos, screencasts, podcasts, digital movies and other content to enrich and humanize online content delivery. Workshop participants can participate in making a basic animated avatar and will receive access to extensive resources to enrich their own course content.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Waialua

    W2: Quick Start to e-Learning 1.0 and e-Learning 2.0 (Bring Your Laptop)
    Edgar R. Weippl & Martin Ebner
    The goal of this tutorial is to give participants all they need to quickly get started with e-learning. This tutorial should be taught in a half day (3 hour) version. In the first part of the tutorial they learn everything they need to set up their first courses for a small department using Moodle. The second part presents an overview on Web 2.0 technologies and how these tools can be used for teaching and learning.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Honolulu

    T3: Instructional Design of Authentic e-Learning Environments
    It has been generally accepted by education and industry that technological and societal changes have led to a need for complex knowledge and skills in both higher education and the workplace. A ‘new’ view on learning has emerged, based on social-constructivist and situated theories, in which real-world problems are presented to students/trainees. Modern instructional-design (ID) models assume that realistic and rich learning tasks are the driving force for learning. Well-designed learning tasks stimulate learners to integrate and coordinate required skills, knowledge, and attitudes in a way that can be transferred to real-life conditions. These developments put forward the need for a design model to accommodate complex learning tasks. However, since such design models are relatively rare, Certainly in the field of E-learning. Designers often have to fall back on their own ideas and intuition when designing and developing their E-learning materials. Even when models are available, designers are challenged to create learning experiences that leave deep and lasting impacts on learners, targeting not just skill development but changes in identity as learners come to see themselves as competent problem solvers and team contributors. This tutorial examines the so-called 4C/ID (Four-Components Instructional Design Model) from Jeroen van Merriënboer (1997) for the development of authentic e-learning tasks.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Waianae

    W5: M-Learning – On the Move towards a Wired Society (Bring Your Laptop)
    Martin Ebner & Walther Nagler
    The society is moving into a more and more totally wired one. By using modern devices like the iPhone or one of Nokia’s N-Series the web is flowing into our daily life. Information just in time from anywhere at anyplace becomes true and helps us to deal with information in a complete new way. Furthermore communication takes place through the web via different channels. However if technologies are pervading our every day life also learning and teaching will be influenced and we have to think about how we can use modern applications in an appropriate didactical way. In this workshop, we will show with different devices how different scenarios are working. Strongly based on real-life examples and live demonstrations participants should realize how m-Learning will enhance the future learning environment
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Kahuku

    W6: Using Wikis to Facilitate the Creation of Problem-Based Learning Environments (Bring Your Laptop)
    Kevin Pyatt
    Problem based learning is an attractive instructional method that engages 21st century fluencies. It centers on ill-structured, complex, real-world problems. Such environments are rarely found in “canned” curricula or texts. As such, the instructor plays a critical role in the design and development of effective problem-based learning activities. Technologies such as Wikispaces show tremendous potential in scaffolding and situating problem-based learning. In this workshop, we will investigate how Problem-based learning engages 21st century fluencies. We will explore design frameworks for Problem-based learning, and will develop problem based learning scenarios specific to the instructor’s teaching context. We will then create a learning space into which the problem-based scenario will be situated.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, June 23rd

  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
    in Lanai

    Welcome & Opening Session: Tara Brabazon: Mayhem, Magic, Movement and Methods: Teaching and Learning About Hearing and Listening
    Tara Brabazon
    Teaching research methods is tough. Students hate it. Staff hate it. Occasionally, there is a comrade or sister who demonstrates as much commitment to Marxist and feminist research methods as Paris Hilton does to shopping, but mostly it is hard to summon enthusiasm. Students approach these often mandatory modules with the excitement of a dental appointment. Similarly, we justify such courses as being good for them, like regular flossing. I had a problem. I had to develop a media methods module that could be taught all over the world to students fluent in many languages and derived from myriad disciplines and professional experiences. It had to applicable and rigorous, flexible and committed, motivating and stimulating. I had few staff, fewer resources and no technical support. It was me, a microphone and an over-stuffed hard drive. My paper explores what happened from the mayhem with methods. It is a truth of education that we teach the surprises. What I learnt was how to transform hearing into listening.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 3:45 PM-4:00 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Wednesday, June 24th

  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
    in Lanai

    Keynote: Stephen Downes: Beyond Management: The Personal Learning Environment
    Stephen Downes
    The first phase of educational media was focused almost entirely toward learning management. This reflects the institutional basis of most educational activities and the learner's need for guidance, support and recognition. With personal media, however, these factors have changed, and as a result we are seeing a second phase, one that may be described as the personal learning environment, or PLE. In this talk Stephen Downes outlines the major elements of the PLE: the motivating factors, the discussions taking place in technical committees, the descriptions and pilot projects beginning to emerge. And from his own work as a technologist and educator he describes new models and processes we should expect to see more in the future, among others including: connectivism and the massive open online course (MOOC), content syndication and aggregation technologies, backchannels, live feeds and multicast events, and serialized RSS feeds. You will want to bring your wireless device to this event.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 3:45 PM-4:00 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

  • 5:30 PM-7:30 PM
    in Kauai/Maui

Thursday, June 25th

  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
    in Lanai

    Keynote: M. David Merrill: What Makes e3 (effective, efficient and engaging) Instruction?
    M David Merrill
    Abstract: This paper presents a problem-centered, peer-interactive model for instructional design that combines elements from traditional tutorial instruction with problem-based learning, communities of learning and distance education. A problem-centered strategy consists of presenting a problem, demonstrating the component skills, presenting a second problem, having learners apply their newly acquired skills, elaborating the component skills, presenting a third problem and repeating the apply, demonstrate cycle until learners are able to complete a new task without further instruction. This approach is enhanced by peer collaboration and peer critique implemented on line in a distributed environment.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 3:45 PM-4:00 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Friday, June 26th

  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
    in Lanai

    Keynote: Thomas Reeves: Little Learning, Big Learning: In Defense of Authentic Tasks
    Paul A. Kirschner, John Sweller, and Richard E. Clark, widely recognized educational researchers, published a paper provocatively titled “Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not Work: An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching” in the Spring 2006 issue of the journal Educational Psychologist. In this paper, they wrote “The aim of all instruction is to alter long-term memory. If nothing has changed in long-term memory, nothing has been learned” (p. 77). Further, they recommended direct instruction, “defined as providing information that fully explains the concepts and procedures that students are required to learn as well as learning strategy support that is compatible with human cognitive architecture” (p. 75) as the only means to guarantee the transfer of knowledge and skills from experts to novices. The authors expressed disdain for instructional models that “challenge students to solve ‘authentic’ problems or acquire complex knowledge in information-rich settings based on the assumption that having learners construct their own solutions leads to the most effective learning experience” (p. 76). Several other researchers have responded to the critique of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching by Kirschner et al., but the debate continues. In this keynote, Professor Reeves will present an argument that although direct instruction may be effective for “little learning,” it simply does not add up to the “big learning” that higher education graduates must achieve in the 21st Century. He will also present evidence for the efficacy of an instructional model based upon authentic tasks that he has been refined over years of collaborative research with Jan Herrington and Ron Oliver.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

Monday, June 27th

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Room 5.1 - Faculty of Letters Building

    eLearning at Your Fingertips – Answering Teaching Challenges and Achieving Intended Outcomes with eLearning Tools (Bring Your Laptop): eLearning at Your Fingertips – Answering Teaching Challenges and Achieving Intended Outcomes with eLearning Tools (Recommended: Bring Your Own Laptop)
    This workshop aims to demonstrate the various ways technology can be used to effectively assist learning at the university level. It will take participants on a journey of exploration of various eLearning tools, while encouraging reflection on their own contextual needs. We will discover eLearning activity designs that enable the achievement of intended learning outcomes and address key teaching challenges. Workshop participants should expect to spend much of the time actively trying out working examples that were developed for, and successfully used by, Hong Kong university students. All participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops for use during the hands-on activities which represent a major portion of the workshop. Additional resources in planning, designing and evaluating eLearning activities will be provided to participants on DVDs as well as made available online.

Virtual Papers