Schedule

Monday, June 22nd

  • 8:00 AM-5:15 PM

    Registration
  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom Centre

    Welcome, General Session & Keynote: Norman Vaughan: Teaching in Blended Learning Environments: Creating and Sustaining Communities of Inquiry
    According to a survey conducted over ten years ago, more than 80% of higher education institutions in the United States offer courses in a blended format (Arabasz, Boggs & Baker, 2003). In the words of Gladwell (2000), we have gone over the "tipping point"; blended learning has become an educational epidemic. The three societal forces that have converged (the perfect wave) to drive this epidemic are technology, financial constraints, and quality concerns. The blended approaches to learning that have arisen to address these forces have lead to three major non-contradictory affordances – effectiveness, efficiency, and convenience. The result is an era of engagement and sustainable communities of inquiry. This session will provide participants with an opportunity to share and discuss strategies for designing, facilitating, and leading blended learning courses and programs. Objectives: The session will provide participants with the opportunity to share and discuss strategies for: Designing and organizing a blended course Facilitating and moderating a blended course Directing and leading a blended course Summary statement: Blended learning has become an educational epidemic in higher education and this session will provide participants with an opportunity to share and discuss strategies for designing, facilitating, and leading blended learning courses and programs.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    in Ballroom Centre

    SIG Meeting: Emerging Technologies for Learning & Teaching
  • 1:15 PM-5:00 PM
    in Salon A

    W1: Partnering for Learning: Boost Student Engagement with Moodle 2.8 (Bring Your Own Laptop)
    Are you tired of bringing papers to class, watching bored faces, and complaining about the lack of participation and incomplete assignments? You are invited to join the workshop to transform your classes with Moodle 2.8 and learn how to partner for learning with your students, colleagues, and other stakeholders. Participants will learn how to get students to teach as a way to learn socially engaging resources and activities available in a Moodle course and presentation tools such as Movenote and Slidespeech. They will access the features from a student's perspective and practice as teachers. Attendees will discuss models and techniques in creating a course and showcase the features they choose during the workshop using simple tools. Interaction and practice will occur both in person and on a Moodle for Teachers (M4T) Moodle website.
  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Tuesday, June 23rd

  • 8:00 AM-6:15 PM

    Registration
  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom Centre

    General Session, Paper Awards & Keynote: Jennifer Howell: Digital blurring – how do we teach in an increasingly converging world?
    Technology and education has been undergoing a change in recent years. The distinction between the technologies we use in teaching and learning and those we use in our personal lives has been blurring. Many of the instructional technologies we use habitually in teaching did not start out as being designed for these purposes, but rather have come from social media, digital devices and digital habits. This has meant that they are more social, collaborative and creative. We have realised the much anticipated dream of being 21st century learners who constantly engage in learning and there is more creativity in the approaches and devices we use. This has crept up on us quietly and without much notice, the political rhetoric of preparing our students to be lifelong learners is now rather redundant. So what is next? Where are we going with technology and learning? Speculating on what is to come in a fast moving space is tricky but possible if we stop viewing everything singularly. It would seem that popular culture, media and cultural studies are converging with technology and learning. This convergence has resulted in a new way of learning that requires multiple skills, abilities and literacies – one that potentially matches the strengths of all learners. In this keynote we will explore how this convergence has resulted in a richer learning space for all educational contexts, from birth through to higher education. Importantly we will also explore how educators can harness this convergence to improve their practice.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    in Ballroom Centre

    SIG Meeting: Learning Design
  • 1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    GROUP A TOUR: Facilities for Authentic, Engaged Learning: District 3 Entrepreneurial Centre and Active Learning Facilities at Concordia University
  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-5:00 PM
    in Ballroom East

    W2: Screencasting for Student Learning and Assessment (Bring Your Own Laptop)
    Douglas Harvey & Ron Caro
    This workshop will provide the attendees with a new perspective on the use of screencasting technology for improving student learning and assessment of learning outcomes. The workshop facilitators will model how they are using student-created screencasts as a strategy for engaging learners with course content, both individually and in collaborative groups. Special attention will be given to methods for assessing screencasts to measure student learning. Attendees will be guided through the process of creating screencasts, and develop assignments and assessments for use in their own teaching.
  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

    GROUP B TOUR: Facilities for Authentic, Engaged Learning: District 3 Entrepreneurial Centre and Active Learning Facilities at Concordia University
  • 3:45 PM-4:00 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

  • 5:15 PM-7:00 PM
    in Ballroom East

Wednesday, June 24th

  • 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Registration
  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Ballroom Centre

    General Session, Poster Awards & Keynote: Jon Dron: A learner's guide to nurturing wise crowds and taming stupid mobs
    No one is a completely self directed learner - whether we learn from websites like Wikipedia, our Facebook friends, reading a book, watching a YouTube video, engaging in a community of practice, observing an expert or simply running a Google search or watching passers-by on a street, we swim in an ocean of teachers that guide, influence or shape our learning. To be human is to be a social learner, and the exponential rise in social media gives us exponentially more opportunities to learn from and with others. Moreover, if we engage at all with others, whether face-to-face, through email, Twitter, Google plus, Pinterest, a blog comment or a Q&A site, to be human is to be a social teacher too. To be alive is to share knowledge, whether as a role model or an anti-model, a storyteller or a demonstrator, a challenger or an affirmer, a critic or an approver, a sharer or a commentator, a friend or an antagonist. And no one is a completely autonomous teacher, especially not those that call it their occupation. There are always at least two teachers in any learning transaction. Even the most formal of traditional teachers does not teach alone: from obvious co-teachers like textbook or website authors and other learners, to less obvious but equally powerful co-teachers like designers of classrooms, makers of timetables, builders or managers of learning management systems, and creators of certifications, teaching is always a distributed role, with a cast of tens, hundreds, thousands or even millions, engaged in a massively complex symphony, orchestrated to bring about learning. We all learn from and with the crowd, and we are all parts of crowds that teach. Sadly, however, not all crowds teach well. For every wise crowd there is a stupid mob, misleading, misdirecting, misunderstanding and misinforming at least as easily as leading us to knowledge, clarity, creativity and truth. This is as true of the tightly regimented groups in a formal classroom or the people in our social networks as it is of the loosely connected sets of strangers with shared interests in Reddit, StackExchange or users of a Twitter hash tag. In this keynote we will explore how crowds can teach effectively, and how to school a crowd to teach us better. We will learn ways to avoid the stupidity of mobs, to exploit the strengths of different kinds of crowd and to avoid at least some of their weaknesses. And we will do so together.
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM in Ballroom Centre
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

Virtual Papers