Schedule

Monday, October 24th

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T1: Blended Learning: Models, Frameworks, Stories, and Examples
    Curt Bonk & Tingting Zeng
    Instead of debating the costs and benefits of online learning, many educators are now exploring ways to blend e-learning technologies and environments. There is both extensive confusion and much optimism about blended learning due to multiple blended learning definitions and approaches. This session will expose the advantages as well as the disadvantages of blended learning as related to the different models. The stories, models, and examples embedded from the HOBLe provide a means to reflect on one’s learning options and help foster intelligent decisions regarding blended learning. Hopefully, the many personal stories and reflections included here can serve as guideposts to others making similar journeys into blended learning environments. Perhaps, most importantly, the session will include more than two dozen different examples of blended learning in actual courses in many different disciplines and levels of institutions. During this session, small teams of participants (instructional designers, administrators, instructors, students, etc.) will build and later present their own blended learning models.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T11: Designing for Reuse
    Robby Robson, Geoff Collier & Brandon Muramatsu
    This tutorial presents guidelines, techniques and best practices for enhancing the reusability of digital learning resources. It is based on material developed and deployed by the Reusable Learning Project (www.reusablelearning.org) the context of the National Science Digital Library (www.nsdl.org). The tutorial will cover the basics of reusability from the perspectives of authors, instructors, students, and repository managers.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T2: Facilitating Online Discussions: Maximize Learning, Minimize Your Workload
    Jan Buhmann
    Are you using asynchronous or live discussions in your Web courses and are overwhelmed by the intensity and volume of the discussion? Are your students not active enough, too active, or simply Away Without Leave (AWOL)? Hear about new research and innovative approaches to facilitation that take participants from individual contributors to collaborators. Best practices in the set-up and moderation of online discussions will be introduced, and seven strategies to maximize learning and minimize instructor workload. Hear how innovators in online learning manage to keep their discussions vibrant and focused with role plays, guest speakers, and debates. In the second half of the workshop, hear how your course can be enhanced with live interaction through Virtual Classroom (Webinar) technology: Hold virtual office hours, check in with your students, give lectures, and conduct live discussions. See what it takes to run a pilot of a new generation of interactive live tools that provide virtual live collaboration spaces to bridge the distance in Distance Learning!
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T3: Designing, Testing and Implementing a Truly Accessible Website Using CSS
    David Boxer & Paul Acquaro
    Using an interactive design process—built around smart information architecture, accessibility standards, and the tenets of usability—create a truly accessible website. Learn how Cascading Stylesheets can be used to make a Section 508 site accessible to alternative devices like wireless hand-helds, text browsers and screen readers.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    T4: Leverage Online Learning Strategies: Ensure Course Quality while Managing Faculty Workload
    Michael Scheuermann
    As institutions move toward offering more blended courses and distributed learning in general, maintaining course quality and academic rigor often mean significantly increased workloads for faculty members. To meet this challenge, instructors have developed ad hoc strategies to reconcile this dilemma. A workshop is the perfect forum where these insights and strategies can be shared, discussed, noted, and taken back to our various institutions and academic colleagues.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T10: Designing for the User: How to Test for Usability: Designing for the User: How to test for Usability
    Rachel Bridgewater & Karen Diller
    There is an increasing need within the computer-mediated instruction community for effective assessment tools that can be used to ensure that interfaces do not act as a hindrance to learning objectives. As our dependence on web-based systems a delivery method increases, it has become essential to assess the effectiveness of our products. One method of assessing these products is usability testing, which analyzes the interaction between users and a product. Because usability testing focuses on users in the design process by studying their interactions with a product, it is an effective tool for course designers and others to use when designing or improving an instructional product. This workshop will teach participants how to assess their instructional products through usability testing. In addition to gaining a general understanding of usability testing, participants will learn how to design testing instruments, how to conduct various usability tests and how to analyze test results. This workshop will include valuable hands-on exercises such as constructing sample instruments, running tests, and looking at the resulting data.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T6: Blogs, Blends, Boards, or Back to the Future: Building the Ultimate Online Learning Environment
    Curt Bonk & Tingting Zeng
    After a decade of significant online instruction, it is imperative to reflect for a moment and forecast where this field is headed. This fun packed session will focus on online community tools and courseware systems needed for intellectually and pedagogically rich, collaborative, and engaging online learning. It will include an interactive and engaging overview of current best practices in online learning pedagogy including motivational techniques, learning style ideas, and many others. Then it will expand these ideas into visions of where we should go next—toward a community of innovative online instructors who seamlessly share their best online teaching ideas and practices. Examples and ideas discussed when presenting the R2D2 model will include blogging, video streaming, simulations, field reflections, case learning, online narratives, scenario learning, concept mapping tools, online journals, etc. Finally, in this session, participants will build their ultimate online learning environment. They will outline the types of online courseware systems and pedagogical strategies that are needed today.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T7: Adaptive Systems for E-learning: Adaptive systems for E-learning
    Peter Brusilovsky
    E-Learning is currently a hot research and development area. A challenging research goal is the development of adaptive E-learning applications. The goal of the tutorial is to provide a brief review of the work performed so far in this area and some important information for those who want to implement their own systems. The review is centered on different adaptive technologies that are essentially different ways to add adaptive functionality to an educational system. In the tutorial I will analyze what kind of technologies are available right now, provide a number of practical examples, and discuss how the reviewed technologies can be implemented on the Web. I will also discuss what is the place of these technologies in large-scale Web-based education, i.e., what and how can work in large scale E-Learning classrooms today.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T8: Security and Dependability in E-Learning
    Edgar Weippl
    http://www.aace.org/conf/edmedia/tutorials/index.cfm/fuseaction/ViewTutorial/eventID/825 Considering the enormous costs of creating and maintaining courses, it is surprising that security is not yet considered an important issue by most people involved, including teachers and students. Unlike traditional security research, which has largely been driven by military requirements to enforce secrecy, in the realm of e-learning it is not the information itself that has to be protected against unauthorized access but, the way it is presented. In most cases the knowledge contained in e-learning programs is more or less widely available; therefore, the asset is not the information itself but the hypermedia presentation used to convey it. Dependability includes most security requirements but does no longer focus on confidentiality, a requirement that is considered not that important by many teachers and students. In this tutorial we build on the findings published in our book "Security in E-Learning" (to be published by Springer NY in 2005) and extend them to include aspects of dependability.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM

    T9: Setting Up Your Own Learning Object Environment: Setting up your own Learning Object Environment
    Martin Memmel, Lars Zapf & Eric Ras
    The use of LOs is essential for the abilities of an E-learning system in any learning environment. A lot of decisions on metadata, granularity, tools, etc. have to be made regarding the constraints of the given environment, and each of these decisions requires an understanding of different fields like terminology, system architecture, and its components. Furthermore, each decision has an impact on various aspects, such as the authoring process, the possibility to deliver personalized content, etc. The tutorial aims at giving guidelines for choosing an LO approach by giving a brief overview of LO theory, by presenting a general architecture and associated components, by introducing suitable Open Source tools, and by explicitly stating which factors have to be considered when deciding on a concrete implementation. An outlook about future types of LOs and their development will also be given. Software Engineering approaches and agent technologies will play a major role in the next generation of LOs.
  • 3:00-3:15 PM
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, October 25th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM

    Welcome & Opening Keynote: Creating Sustainable E-Learning Infrastructures – Moving Beyond the Course as the Unit of Instruction
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Wednesday, October 26th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM

    Keynote & Awards: Never Worry about Transfer Again – Six Strategies for Converging Learning & Work
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Thursday, October 27th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM

    Keynote: OOPS, Did You Mean to Share That? Opensource, Opencourseware, and the Learning Objects of Tomorrow
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Friday, October 28th

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM

    Keynote: Bruises, Barriers, and Benefits: Thoughts on Building an Effective ePortfolio Culture
  • 9:30 AM-10:00 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM