Schedule

Monday, October 17th

  • 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

    Registration

Tuesday, October 18th

  • 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Registration
  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Moloka'i

    General Session & Welcome Keynote: Blended Learning: Prospects for Transforming K-12 Schools
    Elementary and secondary schools were slower than private industry and higher education to embrace online learning options, but budget crises have done what technology evangelists could not. Estimates of the number of blended learning courses taken annually U.S. students have topped 3 million, and online options are no longer limited to course recovery, summer school, and Advanced Placement. This talk will consider the emerging research base on blended learning as part of mainstream practice in K-12 schools-- its effectiveness, implementation, and implications for equity.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Kohala

    T1: Free Resources for Educator Excellence (FREE) for Developing, Integrating, and Delivering E-Learning Solutions (Bring your own laptop)
    E-Learning Solutions (ELS) became widely available in 1997, and its attractiveness and use have increased significantly ever since. This software provides instructors who exclusively teach online with the resources to make course materials like syllabi, lecture notes, tests, asynchronous discussion boards, and live chat available online in one, easy-to-manage location. Online students can use these ELS sites to access course materials, submit assignments, check grades, as well as interact with instructors and other students. Among the most notable are Blackboard, WebCT, Desire2Learn, ANGEL, and eCollege. These vendor-driven software solutions have been extensively adopted by higher educational institutes throughout the United States. In fact, many have also been adopted by K-12 educational curriculum providers to supplement textbooks and other educational materials. This tutorial will provide insight and the presenter's reasoning behind his departure from Blackboard, to creating his own unique E-Learning Solutions using several free open source digital tools.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Kona

    T2: Conducting Educational Design Research (Bring your own laptop)
    This tutorial is designed to introduce e-learning researchers to “Educational Design Research.” A primary advantage of Educational Design Research over other forms of educational research such as predictive, interpretive, critical, or action research is that it provides a direct link between research and practice, and thus the chances that a research project will have a meaningful impact are greatly enhanced. Educational design research utilizes various mixed-methods research strategies that are undertaken with the intent of producing new theories and innovative interventions that account for, and enhance, learning and teaching in naturalistic settings. Participants will create a preliminary outline for a specific educational design research study during the tutorial.
  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Wednesday, October 19th

  • 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Registration
  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Moloka'i

    General Session & Keynote: TechnoTroubadours and Teacherpreneurs
    When Herb Mahelona and Amy Burvall started making music videos parodying familiar pop songs set to history or literature-inspired lyrics, they did not conceive it would develop into a full-blown "project" that would appeal to such a variety of niche groups and reach far beyond the boundaries of their small Hawaii classrooms. To date their collection of 53 videos, produced with relatively no budget and basic tools, have earned over 3 million views on YouTube since being uploaded a year ago and their most popular video – French Revolution to Lady Gaga's "Bad Romance"- has been translated by fans into French, Spanish, German, Dutch, and Cantonese. What is most intriguing is perhaps how this humble teacher-created content has been made useful in not only high school classrooms, but in universities, home-schools, re-enactment clubs, museums, and media/tech conferences around the globe. Mahelona and Burvall consider themselves to be "Digital Bards" or "Technotroubadours" of sorts, and believe in the power of music, storytelling, rhyming verse, and humor in augmenting the learning experience. Their videos have not only instigated conversation about History in cyberspace, but have inspired others to create their own musical interpretations of academic subjects as well. The "Historyteachers", as they are called on YouTube, are getting used to the idea of being "teacherpreneurs" and actively use social media such as Twitter and Facebook to communicate and collaborate globally with "fans". This session will reflect on the use of music and other multi-media elements as "hooks" or remediation for learning, address the impact of teacher and student-created digital content and the importance of connecting/collaborating on an international scale.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

  • 2:30-2:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 2:45 PM-3:45 PM

  • 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

  • 5:15 PM-6:30 PM
    in Maui

Thursday, October 20th

  • 8:00 AM-2:30 PM

    Registration
  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    "Good Morning" Beverage

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Moloka'i

    General Session & Keynote: Connections and Contexts: The Birth, Growth and Death of Online Learning Communities
    Much of what we understand about the notion of online learning communities and how they develop, grow, and die away is based on examinations of formal online learning environments— primarily post-secondary courses managed by institutions of higher learning. As effective as formal environments may be, paying exclusive attention to them limits our understanding of the nature of social learning. Informal learning environments, by contrast, can tell us a great deal about how people learn together in natural settings, and can teach us a great deal about what happens when the authority for learning is entrusted to learners. This presentation considers what we have learned about learning communities in formal and informal online environments and speculates about what is at the heart of how learners make use of social interaction for the purpose of learning.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

Friday, October 21st

  • 8:00 AM-2:30 PM

    Registration
  • 8:00-8:30 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 8:30 AM-9:30 AM
    in Moloka'i

    General Session & Keynote: Visualizing the Future: How Augmented Reality can empower faculty, inspire students and bring ideas to life in the classroom
    Imagine being able to rotate around the solar system, navigate through a data set in 3D, and interact with a simulated ecosystem - all from the palm of your hand. With Augmented Reality, it's possible! Augmented Reality (AR) is a technique through which 3D virtual objects can be overlaid onto the "real world" in real-time, using nothing more than a home computer or a mobile device. In this session we will explore various educational uses of augmented reality including scientific simulations, digital storytelling, assistive technology and data visualization and show how faculty members can use these tools to engage and inspire students.
  • 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

  • 11:15 AM-12:15 PM

  • 12:15 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-2:30 PM

Virtual Papers