Schedule

Monday, March 3rd

  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

    STEM 1 Day Tour: A Moving Experience, Visiting Schools of the Future (Bus Trip w/Video & Lunch): (9AM-4:30PM) STEM 1 Day Tour: A Moving Experience, Visiting Schools of the Future (Bus Trip w/Video & Lunch)
    Bonnie Bracey Sutton , Victor Sutton , Monte Bay, Raymond Rose , Karlene Lee & Andre Denson
    The moving experience of STEM will be a workshop that takes the participants to state of the art schools that practice STEM ( Science, Technology, Engineering and Math ) as a part of their curriculum. Each of the schools has a museum and educational exhibit that teachers would be immersed in as a part of the workshop. Clark County School District has a few unique schools to share with conference attendees. The schools include the new NW-CTA (our new 70 million dollar Career and Technical Academy), Lamping (NASA and archeological dig), McCaw (School of Mines),and Vanderburg (Rainforest).
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Capri 114

    W1: Electronic Reflecting Using Windows Movie Maker (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    This workshop will focus on using Windows Movie Maker to encourage students and teachers to reflect using technology. Samples will be shown from teachers and students in inner city Baltimore and Westminster, Maryland. The basics of inserting video, pictures and music will be shared, and participants will have an opportunity to consider the ways that electronic reflections can prove quite motivating for the NetGeneration. In addition, various evaluative options will be shared.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Royale 8

    W2: Tools for Sustaining Active Learning Communities for Teaching and Learning (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    Leaunda Hemphill , Donna McCaw, Tami Roskamp & Sarah Rigg
    Discover how you can use and integrate social networking tools to support face-to-face learning communities within your own school and district. This workshop will be a combination of lecture, guided instruction, and hands-on practice.
  • 8:30 AM-12:00 PM
    in Capri 116

    W3: Meaningful Assessment Strategies to Evaluate Educational Software or Hardware (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    David Singer
    This workshop will demonstrate and teach participants how to apply valid and reliable scientific methods in order to assess the benefits and effectiveness of the educatonal technologies that they might use.
  • 10:00-10:15 AM in Royale 6
    Beverage Break

  • 12:00 PM-1:30 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Royale 3

    Seminar: Gold Standard Research: A Distributed Collaborative Model (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    Ann Cunningham , Melissa Pierson, Denise Schmidt-Crawford , Kristin Bennett & Adam Friedman
    There is a present and growing need for Gold Standard research on the effects of educational technology on student performance. The purpose of this workshop is to gather together a group of interested researchers from a variety of backgrounds/content areas to formulate research plans, discuss instrumentation for data collection, and to create an agenda for a collaborative longitudinal study that focuses on the classrooms of experienced teachers licensed by technology-enriched teacher preparation programs. Results of a longitudinal study that employs a replicable research design and captures data from a large population can be used to inform teaching and professional practice at all levels of education. A collaborative research agenda can enrich the body of professional literature regarding collaborative distributed research as well as the impact of technology in teacher preparation and the impact on student performance.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Royale 8

    W4: Game and Flow Concepts for Online Learning: Practical Considerations (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    Philippe Lemay
    Games are often described as one of the most representative activity that can generate optimal experiences. They are also said to be not only an experience machine but also a learning one. So exciting avenues arise when one considers how teachers could benefit from these key concepts to optimize the learning experience in a traditional classroom or more effectively in an e-learning setting. The objective of this workshop is to present fundamental thoughts about how Csikszentmihalyi’s flow model and game concepts can lead to more effective and satisfactory course developments.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Capri 114

    W5: Implementing Open Source Student and Curriculum Management Systems (NOTE: Bring your laptop if available.)
    Robert Hancock , Becky Sue Parton , Willie Ennis & John Fulwiler
    This workshop will show participants how to implement open source student and curriculum management software for both the Linux and Windows platforms. Participants will get both an overview of available alternatives as well as practical instruction on installation, implementation, and scalability.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Royale 7

    W6: Teacher Education Goes into Virtual Schooling (Note: Bring your laptop if available)
    Niki Davis , Raymond Rose , Zahrl Schoeny, Dennis McElroy, Rick Ferdig, Ron Ellis , Rachel Graham & Karly Wortmann
    As of September 2007, 42 U.S. states had significant supplemental online learning programs (in which students enrolled in regular schools take one or two courses online), or full-time programs in a virtual school, or both (Watson, 2007). Therefore, it is time to introduce this new mode of schooling into all preservice and professional development programs for educators. The workshop will be led by Niki Davis who will provide an overview of Virtual Schooling and as PI introduce the national project supported by FIPSE: “Teacher Education Goes into Virtual Schooling.” Instructors from the project’s growing national community of practice will also support the workshop and an equity dimension will be led by Ray Rose. There will also be links to initiatives beyond the U.S. Participants will be supported to evaluate and adapt the project’s resources and tools for their own programs and courses, preferably using their own laptop computers with the materials provided.
  • 1:30 PM-5:00 PM
    in Capri 116

    W7: Mobilizing Your Curriculum: Instructional Strategies for Using Low-Cost, Mobile Computers in the Classroom
    Cathie Norris & Elliot Soloway
    We present 10 instructional strategies for transforming pencil-and-paper curriculum into mobile computer-based projects. We will present rationales for why the strategies are effective instructionally, and discuss tactics for making the strategies work in the classroom. Attendees will then use these strategies to design lessons and projects, drawing on their own existing curriculum. A round of sharing and critiquing will follow. We will bring 30 mobile, handheld computers for workshop attendees to use during the workshop.
  • 2:00 PM-5:00 PM
    in Capri 113

    SITE Executive Board Meeting (+ wine & cheese)
  • 3:00-3:15 PM in Royale 6
    Beverage Break

Tuesday, March 4th

  • 8:00 AM-9:15 AM

    Welcome & Opening Keynote: Analyzing Instructional Artifacts as a Strategy for Evaluation and Professional Development
    Despite evaluators’ good intentions and the commitment of schools to improving the instruction they provide, the primary goals and constraints of evaluation activities and those of practitioners are different, if not at odds. Especially in large-scale research and evaluation activities, the need for efficient, standardized data collection approaches works against providing individual schools, teachers, and students with something of value in return for their participation. The systematic collection and analysis of teachers’ assignments and associated student work, as pioneered by Fred Newmann, Tony Bryk and their associates, has proven its potential as a strategy for resolving this tension. In contrast to the administration of surveys or experimental assessments, teachers and students are not asked to do anything other than their normal activities to satisfy the needs of evaluation. By providing a set of theoretically based, reliable analytic constructs for reflecting on not just students’ work but also the activities that teachers ask students to undertake, evaluators provide tools that schools are finding useful for professional development purposes. SRI has extended this approach to research on schools that are striving to integrate technology into teaching and learning. The approach will be illustrated with examples from studies including the evaluation of schools from 12 different countries participating in Microsoft’s Innovative Schools Project.
  • 9:15-9:45 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:15-9:45 AM in Royale 3
    Newcomer Welcome

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 10:45 AM-2:15 PM in Capri 109
    Electronic & Assistive Technology Playground Open

  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

  • 12:00 PM-1:15 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 12:15 PM-1:15 PM

    Meetings

    • Games & Simulations (ITC) SIG in Capri 112 Add
    • Technology Leadership (ITC) SIG in Capri 116 Add
  • 1:15 PM-2:15 PM

  • 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

  • 3:30-3:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:45 PM-4:45 PM

  • 4:45 PM-6:00 PM
    in Royale Skybox 212

    Information Technology Council Meeting (+ wine & cheese)
  • 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Wednesday, March 5th

  • 8:00 AM-9:15 AM

    SITE President Keynote & Awards: Global Perspectives: Visions of the Future for Technology & Teacher Education
    Our International Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education (SITE) affords us the opportunity to examine many issues facing education today, from a global perspective. Looking across nations can often provide a context that will inform local solutions. For example, in the USA, we can anticipate that almost half the new teachers entering their professions will leave by the end of their third year. Is this a USA problem or is it happening worldwide? Are there ways that information technology can help? Knowing the answer to these questions should aid any country in developing a better long-range strategy for retaining teachers. Another trend exerting a strong influence on the world is competency-based education and its accompanying demands on accountability for expenditures and outcomes. One branch of this trend is typified by No Child Left Behind (NCLB)Legislation (2001) in the USA, which pushes for strong evidence that learning is taking place in school environments and asks if technology is worth the investment. Another branch of accountability questions the wisdom of investing in “Third Wave” technologies for children of the world when for many countries basic needs are not yet provided. What do we know about the effectiveness of technology in education? Do we have answers for NCLB advocates or do we wait for this pendulum to swing another way? Do we still believe in computers and related devices as a means of transforming education? The third trend has to do with how we perceive the shape of the world, now and in the future? Is it round (Columbus, 1492)? Is it flat (Friedman, 2005)? Is it a matrix or an interconnected grid with universal standards for all? Is it rich or is it poor? Will there always be a digital divide? Is it old or is it young and ready to begin anew? Looking at the composition of our Society, I think we can agree that the world has become small, even as many problems have become large, and we are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of facing problems together for the welfare of all. Where can information technology best contribute to a better future? Can the “world view” provide hints regarding the best way to proceed toward a sound future for information technology and teacher education? Much has been learned in the past 5-10 years by scholars from many nations. In this presentation, the speaker and various guest contributors will provide the basis for audience dialog on global perspectives.
  • 9:15-9:45 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:15-9:45 AM in Royale 3
    Newcomer Welcome

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

  • 12:00 PM-1:15 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:15 PM-2:15 PM

  • 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

  • 3:30-3:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:45 PM-4:45 PM

  • 5:00 PM-6:00 PM
    in Royale Skybox 204

    Consultative Council Meeting (+ wine & cheese)
  • 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

  • 6:15 PM-7:45 PM
    in Royale 5/6

Thursday, March 6th

  • 7:00 AM-8:00 AM

    CITE Editors Committee Breakfast Meeting (see Lynn Bell for location)
  • 8:00 AM-9:15 AM
    in Royale 7

    Keynote: Thinking Creatively: Teachers as Designers of Technology, Pedagogy and Content (TPACK): Thinking Creatively: Teachers as Designers of Technology, Pedagogy andContent (TPACK)
    The ability to be creative and flexible is critical in face of a rapidly changing world. Nowhere is this more important than in teaching. Teachers operate in a complex and chaotic ecology where success depends on improvising knowledgeable answers to largely unanticipated problems. Technology, and its rapid rate of change, further complicates the the pedagogy of teaching subject matter. Teaching with technology has been called a "wicked problem," because they defy standard problem solving approaches. We argue for an approach than honors teacher creativity as an essential guide for navigating these wicked problem spaces. In this presentation we describe the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework as a way of thinking about teacher knowledge, technology integration, and the role of teachers' creativity. TPACK, with its emphasis on the interaction teachers' knowledge of Content, Pedagogy, and Technology, places teachers front and center as designers of curriculum, who flexibly and creatively integrate technology and pedagogical approaches to help their students understand subject matter. In this interactive presentation we will explore the meaning of creativity, particularly in contexts relevant to teaching and learning. We shall also explore strategies for improving technology integration through nurturing and supporting teacher creativity.
  • 9:15-9:45 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:15-9:45 AM in Royale 3
    Newcomer Welcome

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 10:45 AM-2:15 PM in Royale 4
    Electronic & Assistive Technology Playground Open

  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

  • 12:00 PM-1:15 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 12:15 PM-1:15 PM

    Meetings

    • English Education (TEC) SIG in Royale Skybox 208 Add
    • Information Technology Education (TEC) SIG in Capri 110 Add
    • Leadership & Policy Education (TEC) SIG in Capri 112 Add
  • 1:15 PM-2:15 PM
    in Royale Skybox 211

    Technological, Pedagogical And Content Knowledge (TPACK) (TEC) SIG
    Catalyzed by much interest at the SITE 2007 conference and launched during SITE 2008 by co-chairs Judi Harris, Mario Kelly, Matt Koehler, and Punya Mishra, the Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) SIG seeks to bring together researchers, developers, and teacher educators interested in exploring technological pedagogical content knowledge (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) for use in all content areas and educational contexts. Proposed SIG activities include: O Gathering exemplars of TPACK in practice and making them available via the TPCK wiki (http://www.tpck.org/) O Sharing ongoing and recently completed TPACK-related research results & designs O Discussing TPACK-related issues, challenges, resources (online and in person) O Strategizing for and participating in the continuing development and dissemination of the TPACK framework & exemplars O Planning and doing TPACK-related research and development O Writing proposals for funding for TPACK-related projects The SIG’s activities will be determined by the interests and wishes of its members. Please join us for the TPACK SIG meeting at the SITE conference.
  • 1:15 PM-2:15 PM

  • 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

  • 3:30-3:45 PM
    Beverage Break

  • 3:45 PM-4:45 PM

  • 4:45 PM-6:00 PM
    in Royale Skybox 212

    Teacher Education Council Meeting (+ wine & cheese)
  • 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

  • 6:30 PM-8:30 PM
    in Top of the Riviera, 24th floor

    SITE Leadership Summit (+ dinner)

Friday, March 7th

  • 8:00 AM-9:15 AM

    International Keynote: The Cognitive Challenges of the One Laptop Per Child Program by Antonio M. Battro
    Antonio M. Battro
    One Laptop Per Child OLPC is a non profit association based in Cambridge, MA, directed by Nicholas Negroponte, founder of the Media Lab of MIT. The mission of OLPC is to give a laptop to children - and teachers- of the poor regions of the world in order to create a cognitive environment to support the challenges of education in the digital era (www.laptop.org). OLPC has produced a small, robust and performing laptop called XO at a very low cost, with remarkable features focused in the construction of knowledge by the child, following the developmental perspective of Jean Piaget and Seymour Papert. it is based on 5 principles::Child ownership, Low ages, Saturation, Connection, Free and Open Source. Several countries in Latin America, Asia and Africa are currently engaged in this program. The first results show a remarkable improvement of the quality of learning and teaching, motivation, cooperation, creativity and responsibility. The ownership of such a laptop provides to the child, the teacher, the family and the community new opportunities of growth. The formidable cognitive change of scale introduced by OLPC in education and technology will be discussed.
  • 9:15-9:45 AM
    Beverage Break

  • 9:15-9:45 AM in Royale 3
    Newcomer Welcome

  • 9:45 AM-10:45 AM

  • 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

  • 12:00 PM-1:15 PM
    Lunch Break

  • 1:15 PM-2:15 PM

  • 2:30 PM-3:30 PM