The Current State of Library and Information Sciences Roles

ID: 48762 Type: Full Paper
  1. Remberto Jimenez, New Jersey City University, United States

Thursday, March 24 10:45 AM-11:15 AM Location: Vernon View on map

No presider for this session.

Abstract: The role of the library science professional has evolved over the years. The library science and information professional is no longer just the “keeper of text and media.” Library science professionals are now known by other names, such as school library media specialists and teachers of information literacy. With the transformation of traditional libraries into learning commons and makerspaces, the role of the librarian has shifted to one of enabling learning and collaboration via a variety of methods. The role of the library professional has evolved to also include being a curator, co-teacher, facilitator, program manager, and information specialist. Moreover, the skills needed by library professionals has evolved as well. Today, a library professional may need to manage databases, program code, and co-teach lessons with teachers on a variety of interdisciplinary topics. This paper reviews the current literature and problematics that have emerged over the last ten years.

Objectives

Review the current trends in the evolving role of the library professional as it relates to school settings, enabling learning via learning commons and makerspaces ,and driving forward information literacy.

Topical Outline

A. Brief Review of origins of public libraries in the U.S. B. The Evolution of the Library Sciences Profession 1. The evolution from Library to Learning Commons 2. Evolution of the Library Professional 3. The Library Supporting Information Literacies C. Areas of Opportunity and Further Study 1. Perceptions of the value of Library Professionals by Administrators 2. Librarian Professional Education 3. Information Literacy D. Conclusion

Experience Level

Beginner

Qualifications

Researcher and instructor of information literacy

Topic

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